Review News

'Tubelight': Shines but with low voltage

Salman Khan  has dedicated the film to the families and friends of soldiers who are left behind to fight their own battles.

Published: 23rd June 2017 03:23 PM  |   Last Updated: 23rd June 2017 03:37 PM   |  A+A-

Salman Khan | Express file photo

IANS

Film: 'Tubelight'

 Director: Kabir Khan

Cast: Salman Khan, Sohail Khan, Zhu Zhu, Mohammed Zeeshan Ayyub, Yashpal Sharma, Matin Rey Tangu and Isha Talwar

 Rating: ***

Salman Khan had once said, "Cinema should always be in touch with the soil of the country. My films celebrate the heartland of India." And probably with "Tubelight", he tries to be true to his words. So, he has dedicated the film to the families and friends of soldiers who are left behind to fight their own battles.

The film is an adaptation of the 2015 released American war film "Little Boy".

Set in Jagatpur in Kumaon district and in the backdrop of the 1962 India and China War, the film is the tale of a dim-witted boy Laxman whose brother, the only surviving member of his family, joins the Indian Army. How he survives during the interim period without his brother, forms the crux of the tale.

Visually, the film is enthralling. The wide angle lens used by Director of Photography Aseem Mishra aesthetically capture the stunning locales to perfection. The music and background score further enhance the viewing experience.

But it is the wafer-thin premise, packed with motivational messages and a tinge of patriotic notes that make the plot seem forced. The script meanders with scenes that lack gravitas. A case in point is the scene when Narayan, one of the village bullies, throws Laxman who is walking along with his new friend Guo into a stream. And, when Laxman picks up a rock in defence and asks Guo to run, the assailants just whimper off, and the scene ends abruptly.

In "Tubelight", Salman Khan does not play the dynamic hero that he used to portray with gusto. As Laxman, he fails to exude energy onscreen and hence, disappoints his fans. His mannerisms and body language are strongly reminiscent of Hrithik Roshan's in "Koi... Mil Gaya". His character is endearing but his physical demeanour is not. Initially jarring, but by the last act you are one with the character and the actor. Salman definitely grows on you.

YOU ALSO WANT TO READ; B-Town goes gaga over Salman's 'Tubelight'

Sohail Khan as his younger brother Bharat, has nothing much to offer, except being an emotional anchor for his elder brother, and he performs his part rather perfunctorily.

The only person who steals the show in the film is Matin Rey Tangu as the young Guo, who Laxman befriends. He is charming with his oriental looks and impish demeanour. The Chinese actress Zhu Zhu plays his mother Liling with flair.

Shah Rukh Khan in a cameo with his tattooed visage and ears studded with earrings, as a magician is dead pan and flat. He does not help to uplift the narrative or add emotionally to the film.

Om Puri as Banne Chacha - the guardian of an ashram, Isha Talwar as his daughter Maya, Mohammed Zeeshan Ayub as Narayan with his "knock knees and Yashpal Sharma as Major Tokras -- all brilliant actors have their moments of onscreen glory.

Overall, "Tubelight" has the tempered magic of cinema but it fails to ignite the emotional quotient.

 

Stay up to date on all the latest Entertainment Review news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.